TouchdownBlue.com
Welcome to Touchdown Blue!

Come join our NY Giants community along with other Great Fans of the Game!

Please take a moment to register for free to discuss NY Giants Football and more.

Your friends @ TouchdownBlue.com
Giants News Alert

Giants News Wire
Training Camp Updates
 

Roger Goodell sends letter to fans, promises labor deal

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Roger Goodell sends letter to fans, promises labor deal

Post  Big_Pete on Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:58 pm

from espn.com

Roger Goodell sends letter to fans

Commissioner Promises Labor Deal

With the NFL playoffs set to begin this weekend, commissioner Roger Goodell sent a letter to the league's fans, assuring them that the owners and players will be able to come to an agreement on a new collective bargaining agreement.

"I know we can and will reach an agreement," Goodell wrote. "My goal as commissioner now is to help our teams and players find a solution that is fair to everyone and ensures that football becomes more popular, accessible, and fun. We want the next decade to be the best yet for our fans, and I'm ready to work day and night to make that happen."



Goodell My goal as commissioner now is to help our teams and players find a solution that is fair to everyone and ensures that football becomes more popular, accessible, and fun. We want the next decade to be the best yet for our fans, and I'm ready to work day and night to make that happen.
-- Roger Goodell

The letter was sent to a database of fan e-mail addresses (about 5 million people) the league has collected from various sources, including NFL.com.

Goodell explained that a new CBA will allow the NFL to "secure the future of our game."

Goodell cited the economic difficulties in the United States before stating that both sides need to be flexible in their financial demands.

"NFL players deserve to be paid well. Unfortunately, economic realities are forcing everyone to make tough choices and the NFL is no different," he wrote. "These are not easy negotiations, but the outcome can be positive. If both sides give a little, everyone, including fans, will get a lot and the game will improve through innovation."

Among the points Goodell outlined as goals he would like to achieve with a new CBA are an 18-game regular season, improved player safety and restoring fiscal sanity to rookie contracts.

"Fans tell us they don't like the quality of the preseason games, and we're listening," Goodell wrote. "An enhanced season of 18 regular-season and two preseason games would not add a single game for the players collectively, but would give fans more meaningful, high-quality football."

The commissioner noted that the NFL is changing the culture of player safety with its new concussion initiatives.

"We are changing the 'play through it' culture to a "player-first' culture to ensure that if a player has a head injury, he doesn't play again until his health is certain. We are also addressing the potential wear and tear on players in the way they train in-season and [in the] offseason," he said.

Goodell expressed that he is distressed that NFL rookies in some cases have bigger contracts than proven veterans and wants to address that in the next CBA.

"Earlier this year, Sports Illustrated published a list of the 50 highest-paid American athletes that included five 2009 NFL rookies. Every other athlete on the list was a proven veteran. In 2009, NFL clubs contracted $1.2 billion to 256 drafted rookies with $585 million guaranteed before they had stepped on an NFL field.

"Don't get me wrong: top draft choices will continue to be highly paid. All we're asking for is a return to common sense in paying our rookies. Other leagues have done this and we can, too."

Goodell ended his letter stating that in the end this is "about more than a labor agreement."

"It's about the future of the NFL," Goodell wrote. "We have to improve and will be relentless in our quest. The commitment to our fans is to make the NFL experience even better in the years ahead. With a responsible CBA, we will fulfill that vision."

The current CBA went into effect for the 2006 season, but the owners exercised an opt-out clause in 2008 that ends the deal after this season, saying they can't afford the current system. The players say the league is healthy, thanks to billions of dollars in TV deals, solid attendance, profitable marketing partnerships and overseas interest.

The NFL has not missed games because of labor problems since 1987, when the players went on strike. But the union's executive director, DeMaurice Smith, has said he believes owners are preparing for a lockout this time.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.
avatar
Big_Pete
Giants Legend
Giants Legend


View user profile

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum